Monday, September 22, 2008

[EQ] WHO: Public hearings on the draft code of practice on the international recruitment of health personnel

Public hearings on the draft code of practice on the international recruitment of health personnel

World Health Organization – WHO 2008

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Arabic [pdf 87kb] | Chinese [pdf 480kb] | English [pdf 55kb] | French [pdf 27kb] | Russian [pdf 243kb] | Spanish [pdf 72kb]

 

“…..The number of migrating health workers has significantly increased in the past decades, and patterns of migration have become more complex and now involve more countries. Health worker migration from those countries experiencing a crisis shortage in their health workforce is further weakening already fragile health systems and presents a serious impediment to achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals.

WHO invites Member States, health workers, recruiters, employers, academic and research institutions, health professional organizations, relevant subregional, regional and international organizations, whether governmental or nongovernmental, and all persons concerned with the international recruitment of health personnel to contribute to the web-based public hearings on a draft code of practice on the international recruitment of health personnel
 between 1st and 30 September 2008….”

 

Shortcuts to Articles

 

1.       Article 1: Objectives of the code

2.       Article 2: Nature and scope of the code

3.       Article 3: Guiding principles

4.       Article 4: Recruitment practices

5.       Article 5: Mutuality of benefits

6.       Article 6: National health workforce sustainability

7.       Article 7: Data gathering and research

8.       Article 8: Information exchange

9.       Article 9: Implementation of the code

10.    Article 10: Monitoring and institutional arrangements

11.    Article 11: Partnerships, technical collaboration and financial support



:: Submit your contribution

:: Summaries of contributions received

 

 

 

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This message from the Pan American Health Organization, PAHO/WHO, is part of an effort to disseminate
information Related to: Equity; Health inequality; Socioeconomic inequality in health; Socioeconomic
health differentials; Gender; Violence; Poverty; Health Economics; Health Legislation; Ethnicity; Ethics;
Information Technology - Virtual libraries; Research & Science issues.  [DD/ KMS Area]

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[EQ] Atlas of health in Europe, 2nd edition 2008

Atlas of health in Europe, 2nd edition 2008

   

WHO Regional Office for Europe,

Copenhagen, Denmark 0 ISBN 978 92 890 1410 6 – 2008

 

Available online PDF [138p.] at: http://www.euro.who.int/Document/E91713.pdf

 

“….This updated statistical atlas presents key health figures for the WHO European Region. They cover basic data on populations, births, deaths, life expectancy and diseases, lifestyle and environmental indicators, such as drinking, smoking and traffic accidents, and types and levels of health care.

 

Each indicator is presented as a map to show overall regional variations, a bar chart to indicate country rankings and a time chart to show trends over time in three main country groupings.

 

Using the WHO Regional Office for Europe’s unique Health for All database, combined with the best alternative sources of data around the Region, this atlas offers the most comprehensive overview of health in Europe. In a handy size, this atlas is designed to be an easily accessible resource at all times, in the office or on the road….”

 

Content

Foreword

Technical notes

1. Demography

Notes.........................................................................................................5

Population

Mid-year population, 2006................................................................ 7

Natural population growth........................................................... 8–9

Young population (0–14 years) and old population

(65+ years)............................................................................. 9–11

Age pyramid, 2005.......................................................................... 12

Births

Birth rate.................................................................................... 13–14

Low-weight births, under 2500 g.............................................. 14–15

Births to young mothers (under 20 years)...................................... 16

Births to older mothers (35+ years)................................................ 16

Abortions

Abortions...........................................................................................17

2. Life and death

Notes....................................................................................................... 19

Life expectancy

Conventional and estimated life expectancy...................................23

Life expectancy at birth (years).......................................................24

Life expectancy at age 65 (years).....................................................25

Percentage of life lived in good health

or free of disability, 2002..........................................................26

Life expectancy at birth ................................................................... 27

Deaths

Deaths from all causes ..............................................................27–29

Infant deaths .............................................................................30–31

Infant, neonatal and postneonatal deaths....................................... 31

Perinatal deaths................................................................................32

Maternal deaths ........................................................................ 33–34

Causes of death

Main causes of death by age group..................................................35

Deaths from:

diseases of the circulatory system.......................................36–37

ischaemic heart disease...................................................... 38–39

pulmonary and other heart diseases..................................39–40

cerebrovascular diseases.....................................................41–42

selected cancers.................................................................. 42–43

cancer.................................................................................. 44–46

lung cancer.......................................................................... 47–48

female breast cancer and cervical cancer .......................... 49–50

cancer of the colon and anus...............................................51–52

prostate cancer....................................................................52–53

external causes of injury and poisoning..............................54–55

motor vehicle traffic accidents............................................56–57

suicide..................................................................................57–58

diseases of the respiratory system..................................... 59–60

diseases of the digestive system..........................................61–62

chronic liver diseases and cirrhosis................................... 63–64

3. Diseases

Notes.......................................................................................................65

Some infectious diseases

New cases of:

tuberculosis......................................................................... 67–68

hepatitis B........................................................................... 69–70

syphilis ................................................................................ 71–72

clinically diagnosed AIDS....................................................73–74

HIV infection.......................................................................74–75

Some noncommunicable diseases

Prevalence of diabetes mellitus....................................................... 76

New cases of and deaths from lung cancer..................................... 77

New cases of and deaths from female breast cancer....................... 78

New cases of and deaths from cervical cancer................................ 79

Hospitalization

Hospital discharges for:

cancer................................................................................. 80–81

diseases of the circulatory system......................................81–82

diseases of the respiratory system.....................................83–84

diseases of the digestive system........................................ 84–85

diseases of the musculoskeletal system............................. 86–87

injury and poisoning.......................................................... 87–88

Teeth Decayed, missing or filled teeth in 12-year-olds............................89

4. Lifestyles and environment

Notes....................................................................................................... 91

Smoking

Smokers among adults......................................................................93

Regular daily smokers, 15+ years.....................................................94

Overweight and obesity

Prevalence of overweight among adults...........................................95

Prevalence of obesity among adults.................................................96

Traffic accidents

Injuries and deaths from motor vehicle traffic accidents................ 97

Road traffic accidents involving alcohol...........................................98

Alcohol

Total alcohol consumption...................................................... 99–100

Consumption of spirits and wine.....................................................101

Consumption of spirits, wine and beer...........................................102

Work accidents

Deaths from work-related accidents......................................102–104

5. Health care

Notes..................................................................................................... 105

Health personnel

Number of:

physicians........................................................................107–108

dentists............................................................................108–109

nurses .............................................................................. 110–111

Hospitals

Hospital beds............................................................................111–112

Psychiatric hospital beds.................................................................113

Hospital beds and length of stay.....................................................114

Length of stay in hospital........................................................ 115–116

Inpatient hospital admissions................................................. 116–117

Some procedures

Children vaccinated against measles and diphtheria.....................118

Caesarean sections................................................................. 119–120

Health expenditure

Total health expenditure as a percentage of GDP.................. 120–121

Total health expenditure per person...................................... 122–123

References

 

 *      *      *     *

This message from the Pan American Health Organization, PAHO/WHO, is part of an effort to disseminate
information Related to: Equity; Health inequality; Socioeconomic inequality in health; Socioeconomic
health differentials; Gender; Violence; Poverty; Health Economics; Health Legislation; Ethnicity; Ethics;
Information Technology - Virtual libraries; Research & Science issues.  [DD/ KMS Area]

“Materials provided in this electronic list are provided "as is". Unless expressly stated otherwise, the findings
and interpretations included in the Materials are those of the authors and not necessarily of The Pan American
Health Organization PAHO/WHO or its country members”.

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    IMPORTANT: This transmission is for use by the intended recipient and it may contain privileged, proprietary or confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient or a person responsible for delivering this transmission to the intended recipient, you may not disclose, copy or distribute this transmission or take any action in reliance on it. If you received this transmission in error, please notify us immediately by email to infosec@paho.org, and please dispose of and delete this transmission. Thank you.  

[EQ] Making Sense of Health Rankings

Making Sense of Health Rankings

 

Canadian Institute for Health Information, (Ottawa, Ont.: CIHI, 2008).

ISBN 978-1-55465-329-4 (PDF)

 

Available online PDF [29p.] at:

http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/products/MakingSense_HealthRankings_web_secure_e.pdf

 

“….As Canadians, we all want to optimize our health status and be assured of health care that is effective, timely and delivered by compassionate providers attuned to our needs and those of our families. In an era of increasingly complex medical care and escalating costs, provincial and territorial governments are attempting to balance these public expectations with their pressing fiscal responsibilities. Health care decision-makers, including provincial and territorial ministries of health, local health authorities and hospital administrators, are increasingly relying on a broad range of indicators to gauge the health of the Canadian population, the quality of hospital care and the performance of health care systems.

 

Reports that rank the health of Canadians and Canada’s health care systems according to these indicators are widely reported in the media. These reports often attempt to condense a complicated array of statistics on population health and health care into a relatively simple number, a rank that is used to make

international and provincial comparisons. But in recent years, these reports have often been inconsistent. In one report, Canada is ranked 11th among 24 developed countries, and in another Canada is ranked 23rd out of the 30 countries compared on the basis of the performance of their health care systems.1, 2 Unlike a familiar economic indicator—the gross domestic product (GDP), which represents a complex entity (the total market value of all goods and services produced in a country in a given year) with a single number calculated according to an internationally agreed upon methodology—rankings of health and health care are not yet standardized nor well understood.

 

This methodology paper aims to improve readers’ understanding of ranking reports. It outlines the components and processes that underlie health rankings and explores why such rankings can be difficult to interpret. The paper concludes with a checklist to help…”

 

readers judge and compare the value of health-related rankings.

 

Step 1: Assess the soundness of the conceptual framework

Does the ranking scheme’s conceptual framework cover the areas of health and health care that are relevant to the purpose of the ranking?

Step 2: Assess the indicators chosen to measure selected aspects of health and health care

Are the indicators of health or health care used in the ranking consistent with the conceptual framework?

Are the measures used for the selected indicators meaningful and valid?

Step 3: Assess the data quality

Are data accurate, reliable, complete, comparable and free from bias?

Are data elements defined and collected so that “apples to apples” comparisons are being made?

Step 4: Examine soundness of methods

Are meaningful differences in performance distinguishable?

Are absolute and relative comparisons available for review?

Have appropriate adjustments been made for underlying differences in the populations being compared?

Is the way specific measures are combined in the ranking scheme clear?

Is the specific formula, along with any weights used to combine individual measures or indicators, based on clear and reasonable principles?

Are differences in performance statistically significant?

Have other statistical issues been appropriately handled (for example, adjustments for correlated measures or handling outlier values and ties)?

Have the authors of the report reduced the potential for bias through full disclosure of ranking methods and peer review?

 

Content:

Executive Summary
Introduction

Evaluating Health Rankings

Summary

References

 

 *      *      *     *

This message from the Pan American Health Organization, PAHO/WHO, is part of an effort to disseminate
information Related to: Equity; Health inequality; Socioeconomic inequality in health; Socioeconomic
health differentials; Gender; Violence; Poverty; Health Economics; Health Legislation; Ethnicity; Ethics;
Information Technology - Virtual libraries; Research & Science issues.  [DD/ KMS Area]

“Materials provided in this electronic list are provided "as is". Unless expressly stated otherwise, the findings
and interpretations included in the Materials are those of the authors and not necessarily of The Pan American
Health Organization PAHO/WHO or its country members”.

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    IMPORTANT: This transmission is for use by the intended recipient and it may contain privileged, proprietary or confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient or a person responsible for delivering this transmission to the intended recipient, you may not disclose, copy or distribute this transmission or take any action in reliance on it. If you received this transmission in error, please notify us immediately by email to infosec@paho.org, and please dispose of and delete this transmission. Thank you.  

[EQ] Building Research Capacity to Bridge the Gap From Science to Service

2nd Annual NIH Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation:
Building Research Capacity to Bridge the Gap From Science to Service

January 28-29, 2009 Natcher Conference Center - National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, Maryland

Website: http://conferences.thehillgroup.com/obssr/di2008/index.html

Proposal Deadline: September 26, 2008

Registration Deadline: December 1, 2008

Sponsored by NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) in collaboration with National Cancer Institute (NCI)- National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) - National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) - National Heart Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) -National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) - National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) - Fogarty International Center (FIC)


“…….Although the field of dissemination and implementation research is steadily growing, leaders acknowledge the limited capacity within the research and practice community to conduct the necessary studies. In this spirit, the National Institutes of Health invites you to the second annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation, Building Research Capacity to Bridge the Gap from Science to Service. This year’s conference will provide interactive forums for the development and growth of the field, with a particular focus on ways in which research capacity can be enhanced. Researchers working in the field and/or interested in identifying opportunities and obstacles for dissemination and implementation research are encouraged to attend this meeting.


The goal of the conference is for the research community to exchange ideas, explore contemporary topics and identify concepts, methods and strategies to build research and organizational capacity for dissemination and implementation science. ………..”

 

Draft Agenda
(as of September 16, 2008)

 

Day 1: January 28, 2009

 

 

 

8:30-8:45am

|

Welcome and Opening Remarks
Christine Bachrach, PhD - Acting Director
Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research - National Institutes of Health

8:45-9:30am

|

Plenary Speaker
Jim Yong Kim, MD, PhD
Professor and Chair, Department of Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Director, Fran├žois-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard School of Public Health

9:40-3:15pm

|

Concurrent Sessions
(e.g., Think Tanks, Oral Presentations)

3:15-4:45pm

|

Infrastructure Panel

Lloyd Michener, MD Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA)

Mark Hornbrook, PhD HMO Research Network

Ahmed Calvo, MD, MPH Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)

Eduardo J. Somoes, MD, MSc, MPH Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Linda Wright, MD
The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

Day 2: January 29, 2009

9:00-9:30am

|

Overview of NIH Dissemination and Implementation Research Opportunities

9:30-11:00am

|

Concurrent Sessions
(e.g., Think Tanks, Oral Presentations)

 

 

 

11:15am-12:00pm

|

Closing Plenary
Roy Cameron, PhD
Executive Director
Center for Behavioral Research and Program Evaluation
University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

 

 

 

1:00-5:00pm

|

Technical Assistance Workshop
(concept paper submission required for attendance)

 

 *      *      *     *

This message from the Pan American Health Organization, PAHO/WHO, is part of an effort to disseminate
information Related to: Equity; Health inequality; Socioeconomic inequality in health; Socioeconomic
health differentials; Gender; Violence; Poverty; Health Economics; Health Legislation; Ethnicity; Ethics;
Information Technology - Virtual libraries; Research & Science issues.  [DD/ KMS Area]

“Materials provided in this electronic list are provided "as is". Unless expressly stated otherwise, the findings
and interpretations included in the Materials are those of the authors and not necessarily of The Pan American
Health Organization PAHO/WHO or its country members”.

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    IMPORTANT: This transmission is for use by the intended recipient and it may contain privileged, proprietary or confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient or a person responsible for delivering this transmission to the intended recipient, you may not disclose, copy or distribute this transmission or take any action in reliance on it. If you received this transmission in error, please notify us immediately by email to infosec@paho.org, and please dispose of and delete this transmission. Thank you.