Friday, September 11, 2009

[EQ] Global patterns of mortality in young people: a systematic analysis of population health data

The Lancet:

Volume 374, Issue 9693, 12 September 2009

 

"……More than 2·5 million young people aged 10–24 years die worldwide each year, many from preventable causes. An Article in The Lancet examines patterns of mortality in this age group in a global systematic analysis. Also this week, an Article on Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination in young children, and an Article examining burden of disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in children under 5 years of age….."

Global patterns of mortality in young people: a systematic analysis of population health data

George C Patton, Carolyn Coffey, Susan M Sawyer, Russell M Viner, Dagmar M Haller, Krishna Bose, Theo Vos, Jane Ferguson, Colin D Mathers
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(09)60741-8/fulltext

 

Present global priorities for adolescent health policy, which focus on HIV/AIDS and maternal mortality, are an important but insufficient response to prevent mortality in an age-group in which more than two in five deaths are due to intentional and unintentional injuries.

Burden of disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b in children younger than 5 years: global estimates

Dr James P Watt MD a , Lara J Wolfson PhD b, Katherine L O'Brien MD c, Emily Henkle MPH c, Maria Deloria-Knoll PhD c, Natalie McCall MD c, Ellen Lee MD c, Orin S Levine PhD c, Rana Hajjeh MD a, Prof Kim Mulholland MD d, Thomas Cherian MD b, for the Hib and Pneumococcal Global Burden of Disease Study Team‡

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(09)61203-4/fulltext


Burden of disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in children younger than 5 years: global estimates

Dr Katherine L O'Brien MD a , Lara J Wolfson PhD b, James P Watt MD c, Emily Henkle MPH a, Maria Deloria-Knoll PhD a, Natalie McCall MD a, Ellen Lee MD a, Prof Kim Mulholland MD d, Orin S Levine PhD a, Thomas Cherian MD b, for the Hib and Pneumococcal Global Burden of Disease Study Team‡
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(09)61204-6/fulltext

 

 

 

 

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[EQ] Variations in relative health inequalities: are they a mathematical artefact?

Variations in relative health inequalities: are they a mathematical artefact?

 

Terje A Eikemo1,2 , Vera Skalick√°1,3  and Mauricio Avendano1,4

1 Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, The Netherlands

2 SINTEF Health Services Research, Trondheim, Norway

3 Department of Sociology and Political Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway

4 Harvard Center for Population and Development studies, MassachusettsUSA

International Journal for Equity in Health 2009, 8:32doi:10.1186/1475-9276-8-32

Available online at: http://www.equityhealthj.com/content/8/1/32

 

Background

Substantial research has documented variations in the magnitude of relative socioeconomic differences in health across European countries, and within countries, across different age groups. The aim of this paper is to examine to what extent these variations are determined by differences in the overall rate or prevalence of a health outcome across countries and age-groups in the total population.

Methods

Three surveys (European Social Survey, and two different population census-mortality registry linked longitudinal data) were used. We plotted rates of mortality and prevalence of poor self-rated health against ratios of mortality and morbidity prevalence associated with educational level. We calculated Pearson coefficients to examine the magnitude of correlations.

Results

We found a significant negative correlation between total mortality rates and associated rate ratios of mortality by education in the SEDHA study (r = -0.40, p = 0.04), but not in the HUNT study (r = -0.37, p = 0.06). There was a weaker but significant negative correlation between the prevalence of poor health and associated prevalence ratios by education in the European social survey (r = -0.22, p = 0.00). Correlations increased as underlying prevalence and rates increased, while they were weaker or null at low prevalence or rates.

Conclusion

We found some evidence that the magnitude of relative inequalities in mortality and morbidity is negatively correlated with underlying morbidity prevalence and mortality rates. Although correlations are moderate, underlying morbidity prevalence and mortality rates should be taken into account in the interpretation of variations in relative health inequalities among populations

 




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This message from the Pan American Health Organization, PAHO/WHO, is part of an effort to disseminate

information Related to: Equity; Health inequality; Socioeconomic inequality in health; Socioeconomic

health differentials; Gender; Violence; Poverty; Health Economics; Health Legislation; Ethnicity; Ethics;

Information Technology - Virtual libraries; Research & Science issues.  [DD/ KMC Area]

“Materials provided in this electronic list are provided "as is". Unless expressly stated otherwise, the findings

and interpretations included in the Materials are those of the authors and not necessarily of The Pan American

Health Organization PAHO/WHO or its country members”.
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Equity List - Archives - Join/remove: http://listserv.paho.org/Archives/equidad.html
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    IMPORTANT: This transmission is for use by the intended recipient and it may contain privileged, proprietary or confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient or a person responsible for delivering this transmission to the intended recipient, you may not disclose, copy or distribute this transmission or take any action in reliance on it. If you received this transmission in error, please notify us immediately by email to infosec@paho.org, and please dispose of and delete this transmission. Thank you.