Friday, November 12, 2010

[EQ] Joint Learning Initiative on National and Global Responsibilities for Health

Joint Learning Initiative on National and Global Responsibilities for Health


Lawrence O. Gostin, Mark Heywood, Gorik Ooms, Anand Grover, John-Arne R√łttingen, and Wang Chenguang

a O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown University,  Washington, DC, 20001, United States of America.

b, Johannesburg, South Africa.

c Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium.

d United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health, Mumbai, India.

e Norwegian Knowledge Center for the Health Services, Oslo, Norway.
f Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
National and Global Responsibilities for Health (Editorial), Bulletin of the World, vol. 88, p. 719 (2010)


Available at
http://bit.ly/bEXVPc


“…….
Why are health outcomes among the world’s poor so dire after the first decade of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and despite a quadrupling of international health assistance over the past two decades? We believe that this dynamic can change by establishing clearer understandings of, and forging consensus around and governance structures to support, national and global responsibilities to improve global health.


With the goal of a new post-MDG global health paradigm, we are establishing the Joint Action and Learning Initiative on National and Global Health Responsibilities for Health. The JALI will articulate an overarching, coherent, framework for shared responsibility for health, forging an international consensus around broadly imagined solutions to four critical challenges: defining a core package of essential health services and goods; clarifying states’ duties toward their own inhabitants; exploring all states’ responsibilities toward the world’s poor; and proposing a global architecture to improve health as a matter of social justice.  

The Initiative forges an international consensus around solutions to four critical challenges:
(i) defining essential health services and goods;
(ii) clarifying governments’ obligations to their own country’s inhabitants;
(iii) exploring the responsibilities of all governments towards the world’s poor; and
(iv) proposing a global architecture to improve health as a matter of social justice……”

 

 

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This message from the Pan American Health Organization, PAHO/WHO, is part of an effort to disseminate
information Related to: Equity; Health inequality; Socioeconomic inequality in health; Socioeconomic
health differentials; Gender; Violence; Poverty; Health Economics; Health Legislation; Ethnicity; Ethics;
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and interpretations included in the Materials are those of the authors and not necessarily of The Pan American
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[EQ] Maternal, neonatal and child health interventions and services: moving from knowledge of what works to systems that deliver

Maternal, neonatal and child health interventions and services:
moving from knowledge of what works to systems that deliver

D. McCoy a,, K. Storeng  b, V. Filippi b, C. Ronsmans b, D. Osrina, B. Matthias b, O.M. Campbellb, R. Wolfeb, A. Prosta, Z.
Hill a, A. Costelloa, K. Azad c, C. Mwansambo d, D.S. Manandhar e

a Centre for International Health and Development, University College London, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, United Kingdom

b London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom

c Diabetic Association Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh

d Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kamuzu Central Hospital and Bwaila Hospital, Malawi

e Mother and Infant Research Activities (MIRA),  Nepal

International Health Volume 2, Issue 2, June 2010 at: http://bit.ly/ceH4Hm

 "….The last few years have seen a welcome re-emphasis on the need to address the unmet health needs of pregnant women and children worldwide in an integrated manner.

Although a number of high profile publications have synthesised the main challenges, scientific evidence and policy recommendations for improving maternal and child health, there are many uncertainties and even disagreements about how maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH) services and interventions should be scaled up.

This paper describes the existence of eight 'tensions' which underlie these uncertainties and disagreements. These are
- competition between maternal and child health needs for scarce resources;
- demands for investment across the full continuum of care;
- balancing the provision of community and facility-based services;
- bridging the selective-comprehensive divide;
- using evidence but recognising its limitations;
- managing both the public and the private;
- improving both supply and demand; and
- balancing short-term urgent demands with long-term needs.

Based on a review of the literature and the experience of researchers belonging to the UK Department of International Development's research programme consortium on maternal health, this paper discusses the implications of these tensions for MNCH advocates, policy makers and planners, and makes three sets of recommendations. Two key messages are the need for more harmonisation between the MNCH and health systems development agendas and greater recognition of the limitations of universal 'gold standard' evidence in informing policy development and implementation…"

URL Source:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B985R-508M32G-4&_user=8658650&_coverDate=06%2F30%2F2010&_alid=1537542227&_rdoc=9&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_zone=rslt_list_item&_cdi=59105&_st=13&_docanchor=&_ct=25&_acct=C000055308&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=8658650&md5=4c4f9f185c9b6d8273e2a86346cdc92a&searchtype=a



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This message from the Pan American Health Organization, PAHO/WHO, is part of an effort to disseminate
information Related to: Equity; Health inequality; Socioeconomic inequality in health; Socioeconomic
health differentials; Gender; Violence; Poverty; Health Economics; Health Legislation; Ethnicity; Ethics;
Information Technology - Virtual libraries; Research & Science issues.  [DD/ KMC Area]
Washington DC USA

"Materials provided in this electronic list are provided "as is". Unless expressly stated otherwise, the findings
and interpretations included in the Materials are those of the authors and not necessarily of The Pan American
Health Organization PAHO/WHO or its country members".
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[EQ] Analysing Health SystemsTo Make Them Stronger

Analysing Health SystemsTo Make Them Stronger


van Olmen J, Criel B, Van Damme W, Marchal B, Van Belle S, Kegels G, et al.
Studies in Health Services Organisation & Policy; 2010

Available online PDF [102p.] at: http://bit.ly/b3KoQR

“…..The attention for Health Systems and Health Systems Strengthening has re-emerged in the frontlines of global debate since several years. This document aims to clarify the authors’ ideas and visions on HS development by presenting a framework for description and analysis. The book outlines a framework that can be used by anybody wishing to analyze and strengthen HSs and it elaborates a vision for discussion….”

“…….The conceptualisation of HSs at national level started in the eighties, with models that describe actors and processes. The broad definition of a HS as “all organizations, institutions and resources devoted to producing actions whose primary intent is to improve health” has become widely accepted, but the further elaboration into explanations and strategies has been subject to various interpretations (World Health Organisation 2000).

Frameworks for HSs serve different purposes, from describing or analysing existing situations to predictive and prescriptive models (Hsiao et al. 2009).
The difference between various frameworks is not always obvious and many contain elements of all these aims.
There are comprehensive frameworks for the national level, of which those of the World Health Organisation (WHO) are most dominant
(World  Health Organisation 2000; World Health Organisation 2007; World Health Organisation 2009). A HS analysis can zoom in, resulting in frameworks for subsystems.

There are frameworks for specific ‘building blocks’ (e.g. a fund-flow framework), for the interaction between actors (e.g. a demand-supply framework) or between different components (e.g. frameworks for integration between programmes and health services). An important framework that is focused on the subsystem of primary health care, but that at the same time links very well with the overarching goals and other elements of the HS, is provided by the World Health Report 2008 (World Health Organisation 2008a). Lastly, HS can be looked at from different levels, which brings about frameworks for local health systems or individual health care delivery organisations. A more detailed description of existing frameworks over time is given in annex one………….”

 

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This message from the Pan American Health Organization, PAHO/WHO, is part of an effort to disseminate
information Related to: Equity; Health inequality; Socioeconomic inequality in health; Socioeconomic
health differentials; Gender; Violence; Poverty; Health Economics; Health Legislation; Ethnicity; Ethics;
Information Technology - Virtual libraries; Research & Science issues.  [DD/ KMC Area]
Washington DC USA

“Materials provided in this electronic list are provided "as is". Unless expressly stated otherwise, the findings
and interpretations included in the Materials are those of the authors and not necessarily of The Pan American
Health Organization PAHO/WHO or its country members”.
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in error, please dispose of and delete this transmission.

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