Friday, June 25, 2010

[EQ] Social determinants of diabetes and challenges of prevention

Social determinants of diabetes and challenges of prevention

 

Nigel Unwin a, David Whiting b, Gojka Roglic c

The Lancet, Volume 375, Issue 9733, Pages 2204 - 2205, 26 June 2010
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)60840-9


Website: http://bit.ly/dw1990


Since 2000, the prevalence of diabetes has doubled to around 285 million worldwide, and type 2 disease accounts for 90% of the diabetes burden.
A diabetes
themed issue of The Lancet brings together new research, review, and analysis.

 An Editorial comments: ‘……The fact that type 2 diabetes, a largely preventable disorder, has reached epidemic proportion is a public health humiliation. A strong, integrated, and imaginative response is required………’

Table of contents: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/issue/current



 

 

 

*      *     *

This message from the Pan American Health Organization, PAHO/WHO, is part of an effort to disseminate
information Related to: Equity; Health inequality; Socioeconomic inequality in health; Socioeconomic
health differentials; Gender; Violence; Poverty; Health Economics; Health Legislation; Ethnicity; Ethics;
Information Technology - Virtual libraries; Research & Science issues.  [DD/ KMC Area]

“Materials provided in this electronic list are provided "as is". Unless expressly stated otherwise, the findings
and interpretations included in the Materials are those of the authors and not necessarily of The Pan American
Health Organization PAHO/WHO or its country members”.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PAHO/WHO Website

Equity List - Archives - Join/remove: http://listserv.paho.org/Archives/equidad.html
Twitter http://twitter.com/eqpaho






IMPORTANT: This transmission is for use by the intended
recipient and it may contain privileged, proprietary or
confidential information. If you are not the intended
recipient or a person responsible for delivering this
transmission to the intended recipient, you may not
disclose, copy or distribute this transmission or take
any action in reliance on it. If you received this transmission
in error, please dispose of and delete this transmission.

Thank you.

[EQ] The importance of government policies in reducing employment related health inequalities

The importance of government policies in reducing employment related health inequalities

…Efficient and fair employment and welfare state policies are needed to reduce employment related health inequalities explain Joan Benach and colleagues..

Joan Benach, director of the Health Inequalities Research Group (GREDS). Employment Conditions Knowledge Network (EMCONET)1,2, Carles Muntaner, professor of nursing1,3, Haejoo Chung, assistant professor1,3,4, Orielle Solar, undersecretary for public health1,5,6, Vilma Santana, associate professor7, Sharon Friel, associate professor8, Tanja AJ Houweling, senior research fellow 8, Michael Marmot, professor8

1 Health Inequalities Research Group (GREDS), Employment Conditions Knowledge Network (EMCONET), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain, 2 CIBER EpidemiologĂ­a y Salud PĂșblica (CIBERESP), Spain, 3 Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing and Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Canada, 4 Department of Healthcare Management, College of Health Sciences, Korea University, Republic of Korea, 5 Ministry of Health, Chile, 6 School of Public Heath. Universidad Mayor, Chile, 7 Institute of Collective Health, Federal University of Bahia, Brazil, 8 Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, United Kingdom
BMJ 2010;340:c2154 - 21 June 2010, doi:10.1136/bmj.c2154

Website: http://bit.ly/9GLI1T

 

“………..Globalisation has increased the inequality in working conditions across regions, countries, social groups, and occupations. It has also generated substantial social inequalities in health. Worldwide, about 1000 workers, mainly located in poor regions and countries, die every day because of unsafe working conditions, and an additional 5000 people die from work related diseases.4 5 In rich regions, such as the European Union, long established hazards at work—for example, exposure to chemical products, radiation, or vibrations—have remained stable or slightly decreased in the past decade.

 

Studies, however, report the increase of other hazards, such as work intensification and non-standard employment, and the strong links between these different hazards and health inequalities.

 

For example, working class people tend to be employed in jobs that have poor psychosocial working conditions, and large and persistent health inequalities exist.6 7  In middle and low income countries, most workers are employed in agriculture or manufacturing. They face heavy physical work, the risk of injury, and the risk of poisonings from pesticides and biological hazards. Workers are unequally exposed to hazardous working conditions within countries and as a result health inequalities vary across occupation, gender, ethnicity, migrant status, and other forms of social stratification………..”

 

 

*      *     *

This message from the Pan American Health Organization, PAHO/WHO, is part of an effort to disseminate
information Related to: Equity; Health inequality; Socioeconomic inequality in health; Socioeconomic
health differentials; Gender; Violence; Poverty; Health Economics; Health Legislation; Ethnicity; Ethics;
Information Technology - Virtual libraries; Research & Science issues.  [DD/ KMC Area]

“Materials provided in this electronic list are provided "as is". Unless expressly stated otherwise, the findings
and interpretations included in the Materials are those of the authors and not necessarily of The Pan American
Health Organization PAHO/WHO or its country members”.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PAHO/WHO Website

Equity List - Archives - Join/remove: http://listserv.paho.org/Archives/equidad.html
Twitter http://twitter.com/eqpaho







IMPORTANT: This transmission is for use by the intended
recipient and it may contain privileged, proprietary or
confidential information. If you are not the intended
recipient or a person responsible for delivering this
transmission to the intended recipient, you may not
disclose, copy or distribute this transmission or take
any action in reliance on it. If you received this transmission
in error, please dispose of and delete this transmission.

Thank you.